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Cameron Myers
September 26, 2018

Banned Books Week (Sept 23-29th) celebrates books that are often challenged or banned from public and school libraries. In case you missed out, here are some great displays made in honor of Banned Books Week 2018 by your local Brooklyn Public Library staff!

Banned Books Week Display from Mckinley Park
Banned Books Week Display from McKinley Park Library

 

Book Display from Windsor Terrace Library
Banned Books Week Display from Windsor Terrace Library

 

Interested in checking out some banned or challenged books? Here's a list courtesy of the American Library Association of the most challenged books from last year.

Most Challenged Books

Book Cover: Thirteen Reasons Why
Thirteen Reasons Why written by Jay Asher

Originally published in 2007, this New York Times bestseller has resurfaced as a controversial book after Netflix aired a TV series by the same name. This YA novel was challenged and banned in multiple school districts because it discusses suicide.

Check the Catalog
Book Cover: The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian
The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian written by Sherman Alexie

Consistently challenged since its publication in 2007 for acknowledging issues such as poverty, alcoholism, and sexuality, this National Book Award winner was challenged in school curriculums because of profanity and situations that were deemed sexually explicit.

Check the Catalog
Book Cover: Drama
Drama written by Raina Telgemeier

This Stonewall Honor Award-winning, 2012 graphic novel from an acclaimed cartoonist was challenged and banned in school libraries because it includes LGBT characters and was considered “confusing.”

Check the Catalog
Book Cover: The Kite Runner
The Kite Runner written by Khaled Hosseini

This critically acclaimed, multigenerational novel was challenged and banned because it includes sexual violence and was thought to “lead to terrorism” and “promote Islam.”

Check the Catalog
Book Cover: George
George written by Alex Gino

Written for elementary-age children, this Lambda Literary Award winner was challenged and banned because it includes a transgender child.

Check the Catalog

Check back soon for more special events and library news from Bklyn Kids!


Tags: Book Talk

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