Foucault and the Problem of Justice focuses on a series of lectures given by Foucault between 1970 and 1984 at the College de France on the historical dimensions of institutions and power-relations such as government, law, psychiatry, monasticism and prisons.  This course will examine the lectures between 1970 and 1975, with specific attention to how his study of institutions and power relate to contemporary politics and the problem of justice.

Along with the detailed analysis of Foucault’s lectures, we will look at how Foucault influenced other fields such as gender studies, subaltern studies, and anthropology which expanded and transformed his work in critical ways (e.g. Judith Butler, Gayatri Spivak, Edward Said, Ann Stoler, and others).  Finally, we will consider how Foucault’s research intersects and throws into relief the courage to truth as a form of resistance to political power by considering different forms of activism, especially within the arts.

This series will be taught by Peter Macapia. Marcapia is a philosopher, artist, architect and founder of Peter Macapia Studio and labDORA, an internationally recognized research and design studio. Macapia studied under Rosalind Krauss, John Rajchman, Gayatri Spivak, and Akeel Bilgrami.  Originally from the Pacific Northwest, Macapia moved to the Northeast to study art and philosophy at RISD and Brown for his Bachelor’s, American history at Harvard University for his Masters, and finally Columbia University for his PhD in Theory and Criticism.  He has exhibited and published internationally and collaborated with such artists as Vito Acconci.  Macapia has taught at Columbia University, The New School for Social Research/Parsons, and elsewhere.  He is currently Adjunct Associate Professor of Architecture at Pratt institute where he teaches political philosophy and architectural design.

Foucault and the Problem of Justice is a four week class. Registered students are strongly encouraged to attend all four classes.

Texts and supplimentary readings will be provided to all students.

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