East Flatbush Library - Local History & Photos

All Brooklyn Public Library locations will be closed for Labor Day weekend from Saturday, August 30 through Monday, September 1.

Welcome to East Flatbush Branch, August 2000 Interior View, August 2000 Collections, August 2000 Circulation Area, August 2000 Learning to Read, August 2000 Technology Available to Public, August 2000 Interior, Children, August 2000 Interior, Video Collection, August 2000 Exterior View of Original Branch, c.1955
Branch History

The East Flatbush Branch grew out of a strong partnership between library and community that has marked the history of this branch, and continues to the present. In 1935, community activists began lobbying for a branch library in East Flatbush, between Brownsville and Rugby, and in 1945 a library sponsored by the East Flatbush Council, opened at 749 Linden Boulevard.

The storefront building soon proved inadequate for a rapidly growing readership. On October 30, 1952, a library branch of approximately 3,200 square feet opened in a new building at the present location. This new East Flatbush branch quickly advanced to eighth place in circulation.

In 1961, the building was enlarged to 6,400 square feet, but this was still not large enough for the growing community. In November 1988 the branch was closed and the building demolished except for one wall and a portion of the roof. Under the direction of New York City's Department of General Services, a new building was constructed and completely outfitted with fixtures and furniture.

Community support for the East Flatbush branch showed strongly in 1991, when local merchants in this struggling middle-class community raised over $3,100 to buy books for the library. The branch enjoys a steady patronage base, with children and young adults forming approximately 70% of the library's users. The East Flatbush branch looks forward to serving patrons for generations to come and functioning as a technologically advanced, multi-faceted information center throughout and beyond the next century.