Arts & Culture Events

For a list of all BPL Arts & Culture Events visit our events calendar. You can also subscribe to our RSS feed.

 

Acknowledgments

Brooklyn Public Library gratefully acknowledges the many donors who have provided generous support for public programs at the Dr. S. Stevan Dweck Center for Contemporary Culture, including:

David Geffen Foundation; Fund for the Humanities; Cheryl and George Haywood Endowment for Cultural Diversity; The Hearst Foundation, Inc.; The Kahn Endowment for Humanities Programs; The Miriam Katowitz and Arthur Radin Fund; Los Blancos; Mapleton Endowment; National Endowment for the Arts; New York State Council on the Arts; James J. O’Toole; the Estate of Pearl S. Reuillard in memory of her parents Yetta and Louis Schwartz; Sandra and Peter Schubert Endowment Fund; The Shen Family Foundation; and numerous individuals.

 

  • Detectives: Good, Bad, and Ugly: The Big Sleep
    Wednesday, October 22, 2014 6:30 pm
    Central Library, Dweck Center

    Howard Hawks directed the first film version of Raymond Chandler's 1939 novel of the same name. The movie stars Humphrey Bogart as detective Philip Marlowe and Lauren Bacall as Vivian Rutledge. When a dying millionaire hires Marlowe to handle the blackmailer of one of his two troublesome daughters, Marlowe finds himself involved with more than mere extortion. Novelist William Faulkner co-wrote the screenplay. (Dir: Howard Hawkes, 114 min, 1946) Curated and hosted by Glenn Kenny.

    This series is made possible through Brooklyn Public Library’s Fund for the Humanities, established through the generous support of the National Endowment for the Humanities. Additional funding was provided by the Hearst Foundation, Inc.; the Horace W. Goldsmith Foundation; the Starr Foundation; the Leon and Muriel Gilbert Charitable Trust; the Henry and Lucy Moses Fund, Inc.; and a gift in memory of Samuel and Pauline Wine.

  • Brooklyn by the Book: Marilynne Robinson
    Brooklyn by the Book: Marilynne Robinson
    Wednesday, October 22, 2014 7:30 pm
    Congregation Beth Elohim

    Marilynne Robinson’s stunning new novel, Lila, returns to the characters and setting of her Pulitzer Prize-winning novel, Gilead, in telling the story of a woman’s struggle to build a home and family after years living on the fringes of society. In conversation with Paul Harding, Pulitzer-Prize winning author of Tinkers.

    Tickets are $10 ($7 for BPL card holders/CBE members), or $35 with a copy of Lila ($32 for Brooklyn Public Library card holders and CBE members). Click here to buy tickets!

  • Naguib Mahfouz
    Great Books Discussion Series: Naguib Mahfouz's Cairo Trilogy
    Thursday, October 23, 2014 2:00 pm
    Central Library, Reverend Elsie Smith Room

    Palace of Desire: The perspective shifts to Ahmad’s youngest son Kamal, who falls in love with Aisha, the daughter of a wealthy family in Cairo’s richest quarter.

    The Great Books Discussion Series is made possible in part with support from the National Endowment for the Arts and with public funds from the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature.

  • POSTPONED: Brooklyn Spirits: Craft Cocktails and Stories from the World’s Hippest Borough
    Thursday, October 23, 2014 7:00 pm
    Central Library, Dweck Center

    THIS EVENT HAS BEEN POSTPONED. Over the past two decades, Brooklyn has become the epicenter of a Slow Food-inspired food and drink revolution. Brooklyn distillers, restaurateurs, bartenders, and cocktail aficionados are changing the way we drink by bringing back old techniques and recipes, and creating new ones that focus on small-batch distilling and fresh, local ingredients. Join author and Brooklyn-based drinker Peter Thomas Fornatale for an inspiring mix of recipes, profiles of local distilleries and the history of distilling in Brooklyn.

  • We Run the Ship
    Events for Youth & Families: We Run the Ship
    Saturday, October 25, 2014 1:00 pm
    Central Library, Dweck Center

    Featuring original music, live puppets and big decisions. Each show travels throughout the performance space, as the audience members make individual and group choices that bring the story to life around them. With fresh and salty ship captains, a pair of star-crossed sneakers, a wandering troubadour, and an invisible dog, this is a show for all ages and imaginations to choose where they want to go next.

    This program is made possible through generous support from the Estate of Pearl S. Reuillard in memory of her parents Yetta and Louis Schwartz.

  • Russian Literary Series: Veronica Dolina
    Saturday, October 25, 2014 4:00 pm
    Central Library, Dweck Center

    Veronica Dolina, in her repeat appearance at the library, presents her new program "Famusov's House". This is a collection of her new songs and poems about the old Moscow. In Russian.

    This series is made possible in part with support from the National Endowment for the Arts and with public funds from the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature.

  • Life Behind Bars: Aging in Prisons
    Sunday, October 26, 2014 1:00 pm
    Central Library, Dweck Center

    Serving Life documents an extraordinary hospice program inside Louisiana’s maximum security prison at Angola, where fellow lifers care for dying inmates. Produced by Oprah Winfrey and narrated by Forest Whitaker. (Dir: Lisa R. Cohen, 85 min, 2011)

    The guest panel will include:

    • Soffiyah Elijah - Executive Director of Correctional Association of NY
    • Dr. Tina Maschi - Founder and Executive Director of Be the Evidence International Fordham University
    • Lisa R. Cohen - Director, Serving Life

  • Rolf Schulte
    Classical Interludes: Rolf Schulte and James Goldsworthy
    Sunday, October 26, 2014 4:00 pm
    Central Library, Dweck Center

    Rolf Schulte, violin, and James Goldsworthy, piano, two internationally known artists, perform works by Antonín Dvořák, Bedřich Smetana, Edvard Grieg and Josef Suk.

    Mr. Schulte made his debut with the Philharmonia Hungarica in Cologne at age 14. He has since performed with the Berlin and Munich philharmonics, Frankfurt Museums-Orchester, Stuttgart State Orchestra and Orchestra del Teatro La Fenice, Venice, among others. In America he has performed with the Seattle, Vermont and New Hampshire symphonies and has appeared with the Lincoln Center Chamber Music Society.

    Mr. Goldsworthy has appeared in concert with violinist Lilo Kantorowicz-Glick and violist Jacob Glick and accompanied singers in recital, including Judith Bettina, Benjamin Luxon and Véronique Dubois. He has also performed as soloist throughout Europe, Japan, Israel, Canada and the United States. He has premiered works by Milton Babbitt, Chester Biscardi, Cheng Yong Wang and a host of other composers. Children under 6 will not be admitted.

    RSVP here.

    Classical Interludes is made possible in part by a generous gift from James J. O’Toole and is supported in part with public funds from the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature.

  • Detectives: Good, Bad, and Ugly: Murder, My Sweet
    Wednesday, October 29, 2014 6:30 pm
    Central Library, Dweck Center

    Detective Phillip Marlowe returns, this time portrayed by one-time movie crooner Dick Powell who literally turned his career around in this film noir. Hired by hulking, psychotic Moose Malloy to locate Moose's old girl friend, Marlowe is pitched headlong into a morass of intrigue and deception. (Dir: Edward Dmytryk, 95 min, 1944) Curated and hosted by Glenn Kenny.

    This series is made possible through Brooklyn Public Library’s Fund for the Humanities, established through the generous support of the National Endowment for the Humanities. Additional funding was provided by the Hearst Foundation, Inc.; the Horace W. Goldsmith Foundation; the Starr Foundation; the Leon and Muriel Gilbert Charitable Trust; the Henry and Lucy Moses Fund, Inc.; and a gift in memory of Samuel and Pauline Wine.

  • Brooklyn by the Book: Bryan Stevenson and Ta-Nehisi Coates
    Brooklyn by the Book: Bryan Stevenson and Ta-Nehisi Coates
    Thursday, October 30, 2014 7:00 pm
    Central Library, Dweck Center

    When law professor and criminal justice attorney Bryan Stevenson first visited a maximum security prison as a law student he knew little about the justice system. Since then he’s made its reform his life’s work. In Just Mercy, Stevenson shares his experiences from his time as an idealistic young attorney to his founding of the Equal Justice Initiative, a non-profit dedicated to helping those who have been denied fair and just treatment in the legal system. In conversation with writer and senior editor of The Atlantic Ta-Nehisi Coates.

    Tickets are free but reservations are encouraged. Click here to RSVP! Please note that seating is first-come, first-served.

  • Suzi Shelton, A Musical Road Trip of Fun
    Events for Youth & Families: A Musical Road Trip of Fun
    Saturday, November 1, 2014 1:00 pm
    Central Library, Dweck Center

    Suzi Shelton is an award winning singer/songwriter and a local favorite in the children's music scene. Suzi is perhaps best known for her crowd pleasing "fist pumping" songs like 'Goin' On a Road Trip," and "Scooter Boy." She has recently released her third solo album "Smile In My Heart," to critical acclaim which is proving to be a FEEL-GOOD FOR EVERYBODY collection of 12 new songs, including her new hits "Go, Fire Truck, Go," and "Cinnamon Bear." Join Suzi and her band as they journey through a musical road trip of songs that will take you from the breezy tropical islands to the majestic Yellowstone National Park, and all the way back to the heart of Brooklyn.

    This program is made possible through generous support from the Estate of Pearl S. Reuillard in memory of her parents Yetta and Louis Schwartz.

  • Kendall Williams
    Pan in Motion: Kendall Williams in Concert
    Saturday, November 1, 2014 4:00 pm
    Central Library, Dweck Center

    Pan in Motion features works for steel pan by Williams, American Composers Orchestra’s 2013/2014 Van Lier Emerging Composer Fellow. His pieces display the versatility of the steel pan, an instrument born out of Trinidad and Tobago, which is one of the newest acoustical instruments to be incorporated into Caribbean, contemporary classical, and expressive jazz movements.

  • Silent Film Series: I was Born, But...
    Silent Film Series: I was Born, But...
    Sunday, November 2, 2014 1:00 pm
    Central Library, Dweck Center

    Japanese director Yasujiro Ozu’s story of two young brothers who move to a Tokyo suburb with their parents and must learn to cope with a new neighborhood, and neighborhood gang. It begins like an Our Gang comedy, with touches of drama and social satire added, as the brothers strive to understand power in their child's world and, unexpectedly, get a glimpse of power in the adult world. (Dir: Yasujiro Ozu, 90 min, 1932). With live piano accompaniment by Makia Matsumura. Hosted and curated by Ken Gordon. Children under 6 will not be admitted.

    The Silent Film Series is sponsored by Los Blancos.

  • Classical Interludes: Robert Een
    Sunday, November 2, 2014 4:00 pm
    Central Library, Dweck Center

    Een, composer, singer, cellist, performs his Walt Whitman song cycle for cello and voice, as well as a selection of his scores for dance, theater and film featuring a female vocalist and a hammer dulcimer player. Een is known for extended vocal/cello techniques and has recorded twelve albums of original music; scored films for directors Eric Stoltz, Noah Baumbach, and Tony Goldwyn, as well as theater/dance scores: Dan Hurlin, Liz Lerman, Stephan Koplowitz, David Dorfman, Yin Mei, Brian Selznick, Yoshiko Chuma, Pearson/Widrig, Heidi Duckler and Ron K. Brown, and Lionel Popkin. Children under 6 will not be admitted.

    RSVP here.

    Classical Interludes is made possible in part by a generous gift from James J. O’Toole and is supported in part with public funds from the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature.

  • Brooklyn Open, Open Mic
    Brooklyn Open
    Monday, November 3, 2014 5:00 pm
    Central Library, Dweck Center

    The Brooklyn Open is a monthly open mic series for teens. It is a safe space for poets, spoken work artists, emcees, scholars and activists to share their powerful and important voices. These events are run by youth for youth, with youth DJs, youth hosts and a monthly featured poet.

    Presented in partnership with Urban Word NYC.

  • Stomp, Clap & Sing with Bari Koral
    Stomp, Clap & Sing with Bari Koral
    Tuesday, November 4, 2014 11:00 am
    Central Library, Dweck Center

    Bari Koral is quickly becoming one of the most popular kids/family recording artists. Her catchy, pop friendly tunes, interactive live shows & heavy rotation radio play have gained her thousands of young (and not so young!) fans. The band’s hit album Rock and Roll Garden won the NAPPA Gold Award and Silver Parents’ Choice award as best album for tots. Her current album Anna and the Cupcakes features 10 wonderful new songs for children and families. Anna and the Cupcakes was recently named one of the coolest albums for kids by People Magazine. Children may pop like popcorn, surf the waves, run like the gingerbread man & may even learn to jam with the band.

    This program is made possible through generous support from the Estate of Pearl S. Reuillard in memory of her parents Yetta and Louis Schwartz.

  • Detectives: Good, Bad, and Ugly: Touch of Evil
    Detectives: Good, Bad, and Ugly: Touch of Evil
    Wednesday, November 5, 2014 6:30 pm
    Central Library, Dweck Center

    This south-of-the-border mystery is considered to be one of the great movies of Orson Welles, who both directed and starred in it. On honeymoon with his new bride, Susan (Janet Leigh) Mexican-born policeman Mike Vargas (Charlton Heston) agrees to investigate a bomb explosion. In so doing, he incurs the wrath of local police chief Hank Quinlan (Welles), a corrupt, bullying behemoth with a “perfect” arrest record. (Dir: Orson Welles, 95 min, 1958) Curated and hosted by Glenn Kenny.

    This series is made possible through Brooklyn Public Library’s Fund for the Humanities, established through the generous support of the National Endowment for the Humanities. Additional funding was provided by the Hearst Foundation, Inc.; the Horace W. Goldsmith Foundation; the Starr Foundation; the Leon and Muriel Gilbert Charitable Trust; the Henry and Lucy Moses Fund, Inc.; and a gift in memory of Samuel and Pauline Wine.

  • Naguib Mahfouz
    Great Books Discussion Series: Naguib Mahfouz's Cairo Trilogy
    Thursday, November 6, 2014 2:00 pm
    Central Library, Reverend Elsie Smith Room

    Sugar Street: Kamal watches his nephews, a socialist and a budding Muslim Brother, take up the mantle of protest, shuffling between jail and Cairo’s famous Tahrir Square.

    The Great Books Discussion Series is made possible in part with support from the National Endowment for the Arts and with public funds from the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature.

  • dweck-lec'-tic: Lazarus Rose
    dweck-lec’-tic: The Lazarus Project with Vlada Tomova and Chris Rael
    Thursday, November 6, 2014 7:00 pm
    Central Library, Dweck Center

    Inspired by the artists’ Sephardic family roots, Tomova and Rael blended old Ladino singing with Western and South Asian influences. The Lazarus Project features an exceptional array of instruments: Indian sitar, Portuguese guitar, Turkish saz, an extraordinary collection of world percussion from Africa, India and the Middle East, as well as violin, 12-string guitar, bass, and the option of adding viola and bassoon. With this unorthodox instrumentation, they offer audiences a unique, exuberant perspective on these traditional music forms.

    RSVP here.

    This series is made possible in part with public funds from the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature.

  • Brooklyn by the Book: Karen Armstrong
    Brooklyn by the Book: Karen Armstrong
    Thursday, November 6, 2014 7:30 pm
    Congregation Beth Elohim

    In Fields of Blood: Religion and the History of Violence, scholar Karen Armstrong, whose many books include Muhammad, Buddha, and A History of God, offers a complex, compassionate, and nuanced examination of the impulse toward violence in each of the world’s great religions.

    Tickets are $10 ($7 for Brooklyn Public Library card holders & CBE members).  Click here to buy tickets!

  • Events for Youth & Families: Pinkalicious
    Events for Youth & Families: Pinkalicious
    Saturday, November 8, 2014 1:00 pm
    Central Library, Dweck Center

    This is the tale, based on the popular book by Victoria Kann and Elizabeth Kann, of Pinkalicious, who can't stop eating pink cupcakes despite warnings from her parents. Her pink indulgence lands her at the doctor's office with Pinkititis, an affliction that turns her pink from head to toe - a dream come true for this pink loving enthusiast! But when her hue goes too far, only Pinkalicious can figure out a way to get out of this pink predicament.

    This program is made possible through generous support from the Estate of Pearl S. Reuillard in memory of her parents Yetta and Louis Schwartz.

  • Parallel Exit
    Parallel Exit
    Saturday, November 8, 2014 4:00 pm
    Central Library, Dweck Center

    Parallel Exit is a critically acclaimed physical theatre and comedy troupe that blends a twenty-first century sensibility with the family-friendly whimsy of yesteryear. Performances are appropriate for kids and adults of all ages.

  • Russian Literary Series: Transatlantic Matrix with Tatyana Tolstaya and Alexande
    Russian Literary Series: Transatlantic Matrix with Tatyana Tolstaya and Alexander Genis
    Sunday, November 9, 2014 1:00 pm
    Central Library, Dweck Center

    Writer Tolstaya and literary critic and essayist Genis discuss Tolstaya’s most recent, long-anticipated book Ethereal Worlds, which includes two novellas, short stories and essays. In Russian.

    This series is made possible in part with support from the National Endowment for the Arts and with public funds from the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature.

  • Benjamin Hochman
    Classical Interludes: Benjamin Hochman and Randall Scarlata
    Sunday, November 9, 2014 4:00 pm
    Central Library, Dweck Center

    Benjamin Hochman, piano, and Randall Scarlata, baritone, will be performing Franz Schubert’s “Die Schöne Müllerin.” This song cycle is based on poems by Wilhelm Müller. It is the earliest extended song cycle to be widely performed. The work is considered one of Schubert's most important cycles, and one of the pinnacles of Lied, and it is widely performed and recorded. Children under 6 will not be admitted.

    RSVP here.

    Classical Interludes is made possible in part by a generous gift from James J. O’Toole and is supported in part with public funds from the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature.

  • The Pink Panther
    Detectives: Good, Bad, and Ugly: The Pink Panther
    Wednesday, November 12, 2014 6:30 pm
    Central Library, Dweck Center

    Police inspector Clouseau (Peter Sellers) tries to catch The Phantom, a daring jewel thief whose identity and features are unknown. Actor David Niven stars as Sir Charles Litton, aka The Phantom. Although Clouseau was meant to be a minor character, Sellers’s bumbling sleuth moved to center stage in a series of farcical sequels. (Dir: Blake Edwards, 115 min, 1963) Curated and hosted by Glenn Kenny.

    This series is made possible through Brooklyn Public Library’s Fund for the Humanities, established through the generous support of the National Endowment for the Humanities. Additional funding was provided by the Hearst Foundation, Inc.; the Horace W. Goldsmith Foundation; the Starr Foundation; the Leon and Muriel Gilbert Charitable Trust; the Henry and Lucy Moses Fund, Inc.; and a gift in memory of Samuel and Pauline Wine.

  • Gotham: New York City's Best Writers: Leslie Jamison and Charles DAmbrosio
    Gotham: New York City's Best Writers: Leslie Jamison and Charles D’Ambrosio
    Saturday, November 15, 2014 1:00 pm
    Central Library, Dweck Center

    Jamison, author of The Empathy Exams, and D’Ambrosio, author of Loitering, discuss compassion, empathy and the art of the essay. Leslie Jamison’s visceral and revealing essays ask essential questions about our basic understanding of others: How can we feel another’s pain, especially when pain can be assumed, distorted, or performed? D’Ambrosio is the author of The Dead Fish Museum, The Point and Orphans, a collection of essays. His work is exacting and emotionally generous, often as funny as it is devastating. Curated and hosted by Rob Spillman. Books will be sold at this event.

    RSVP here.

    This series is made possible in part with public funds from the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature.

  • Author Talk: Lauren Oliver
    Author talk: Lauren OliverCancelled
    Saturday, November 15, 2014 4:00 pm
    Central Library, Dweck Center

    Lauren Oliver makes her adult debut with this mesmerizing story in a tale of family, ghosts, secrets, and mystery, in which the lives of the living and the dead intersect in shocking, surprising, and moving ways.

    Wealthy Richard Walker has just died, leaving behind his country house. His estranged family—bitter ex-wife Caroline, troubled teenage son Trenton, and unforgiving daughter Minna—have arrived for their inheritance. But the Walkers are not alone. Prim Alice and the cynical Sandra, long dead former residents bound to the house, linger within its claustrophobic walls. Oliver’s previous Young Adult novels include Panic, Before I Fall and Delirium. Books will be sold at this event.

  • Anand Gopal, No Good Men Among the Living
    The Longest War: A Conversation with Anand Gopal on the U.S. in Afghanistan
    Saturday, November 15, 2014 4:00 pm
    Central Library, Dweck Center

    In No Good Men Among the Living, acclaimed journalist Anand Gopal traces in vivid detail the lives of three Afghans caught in America’s war on terror. With its intimate accounts of life in war-torn Afghanistan, Gopal’s thoroughly original reporting lays bare the workings of America’s longest war and the truth behind its prolonged agony. A heartbreaking story of mistakes and misdeeds, No Good Men Among the Living challenges our usual perceptions of the Afghan conflict, its victims, and its supposed winners. “Gopal’s book is essential reading for anyone concerned about how America got Afghanistan so wrong,” wrote The New York Times Book Review. “It is a devastating, well-honed prosecution detailing how our government bungled the initial salvo in the so-called war on terror, ignored attempts by top Taliban leaders to surrender, trusted the wrong people and backed a feckless and corrupt Afghan regime…. It is ultimately the most compelling account … of how Afghans themselves see the war.”

    Gopal has served as an Afghanistan correspondent for The Wall Street Journal and The Christian Science Monitor, and has reported on the Middle East and South Asia for Harper’sThe NationThe New Republic, Foreign Policy, and other publications. No Good Men Among the Living was longlisted for the National Book Award this year.

    This event is co-presented with Guernica: A Magazine of Art & Politics.

  • Classical interludes: Carnegie Hall Neighborhood Concert Series: Ensemble ACJWCancelled
    Sunday, November 16, 2014 4:00 pm
    Central Library, Dweck Center

    Members of Ensemble ACJW are alumni or current fellows of The Academy, a two-year fellowship program of Carnegie Hall, The Juilliard School, and The Weill Music Institute in partnership with the New York City Department of Education, designed to prepare the world's finest young professional musicians for careers that combine musical excellence with teaching, community outreach, advocacy, and leadership. The Ensemble will perform Bohuslav Martinu’s “La revue de cuisine” and Ern? Dohnanyi’s Sextet in C Major, Op. 37. Children under 6 will not be admitted.

    Carnegie Hall’s Neighborhood Concerts is a program of the Weill Music Institute.

  • Stomp, Clap & Sing with Miss Nina
    Stomp, Clap & Sing with Miss Nina
    Tuesday, November 18, 2014 11:00 am
    Central Library, Dweck Center

    Join Miss Nina for sing-along, move-along and read-along fun! Ms. Nina’s passions are providing children and their families the space and opportunity to enjoy music and movement together, and fostering a love of books and reading in children through music.

    This program is made possible through generous support from the Estate of Pearl S. Reuillard in memory of her parents Yetta and Louis Schwartz.

  • Brooklyn by the Book: Stoner: Ruth Rendell
    Brooklyn by the Book: A Celebration of Stoner
    Tuesday, November 18, 2014 7:00 pm
    Central Library, Dweck Center

    How did John Williams’ 1965 novel, Stoner, suddenly land on bestseller lists across Europe last year? When New York Review Books put the novel back into print in 2006, word of its excellence spread from reader to reader and writer to writer. Join us for a conversation on Stoner’s resurgence with novelist Ruth Rendell, critic and classicist Daniel Mendelsohn, and poet and memoirist Honor Moore. Moderated by writer and literary critic Liesl Schillinger.  Books will be for sale through Community Bookstore.

    Tickets are free but reservations are encouraged. Click here to RSVP! Please note that seating is first-come, first-served. 

  • Detectives: Good, Bad and Ugly: The French Connection
    Detectives: Good, Bad, and Ugly: The French Connection
    Wednesday, November 19, 2014 6:30 pm
    Central Library, Dweck Center

    Popeye Doyle (Gene Hackman) is a New York narc who is vicious, obsessed and a little mad. A $32 million shipment of high-grade heroin is smuggled from France to New York. Doyle, a tough cop with a shaky reputation, stumbles on the heroin deal and pursues it with a single-minded ferocity. (Dir: William Friedkin, 104 min, 1971). Curated and hosted by Glenn Kenny.

    This series is made possible through Brooklyn Public Library’s Fund for the Humanities, established through the generous support of the National Endowment for the Humanities. Additional funding was provided by the Hearst Foundation, Inc.; the Horace W. Goldsmith Foundation; the Starr Foundation; the Leon and Muriel Gilbert Charitable Trust; the Henry and Lucy Moses Fund, Inc.; and a gift in memory of Samuel and Pauline Wine.

  • Naguib Mahfouz
    Great Books Discussion Series: Naguib Mahfouz's Cairo Trilogy
    Thursday, November 20, 2014 2:00 pm
    Central Library, Reverend Elsie Smith Room

    Miramar: through multiple perspectives, tells the story of the beloved and beautiful low-born woman, Zohra. As with most of Mahfouz’s work, his character is a cipher for 20th century Egypt.

    The Great Books Discussion Series is made possible in part with support from the National Endowment for the Arts and with public funds from the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature.

  • Russian Film Series: Territory, Quiet in Odessa
    Russian Film Series: The Territory and Quiet in Odessa
    Thursday, November 20, 2014 7:00 pm
    Central Library, Dweck Center

    The Territory is an unfiltered look into the lives of Israelis from the former Soviet Union who made their new home in the West Bank settlements. While some residents move to the settlements looking for cheaper housing, most are motivated by Zionist ideology; and all are influenced by their past experience of being a minority in the Soviet Union. The film is an exploration of questions of identity, religion and conflict. In Russian, Hebrew and Arabic with English subtitles (Dir: Dmitriy Khavin, 42 min, 2013)

    In addition we will be showing a second film: Quiet in Odessa: In the aftermath of the Ukraine's Euromaidan revolution and violent clashes between pro-Russian and pro-Ukrainian supporters in Odessa on May 2, Jewish residents of Odessa tell stories of their newly found patriotism and share their thoughts on how recent events have affected the community and the city. Through a series of interviews with the members of the Jewish community the film delves into the history of Jews in Odessa, assimilation, immigration and the issues of identity. The film is in Russian, Ukrainian and Yiddish with English subtitles. (Dir: Dmitriy Khavin, 43 min, 2014)

    This series is made possible in part with support from the National Endowment for the Arts and with public funds from the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature.

  • Events for Youth & Families: Magic of Amore
    Events for Youth & Families: Magic of Amore: Extra! Extra! Read All About It!
    Saturday, November 22, 2014 1:00 pm
    Central Library, Dweck Center

    The always popular master magician Amore will present an edge of your seat fun family magic show celebrating the magic of thanksgiving. Witness amazing magic and mind reading. Laugh and be amazed with a show you will long remember. From the moment the show begins until the grand finale children and adults will be mesmerized and mystified.

    This program is made possible through generous support from the Estate of Pearl S. Reuillard in memory of her parents Yetta and Louis Schwartz.

  • Brooklyn Open, Open Mic
    Brooklyn Open
    Monday, December 1, 2014 5:00 pm
    Central Library, Dweck Center

    The Brooklyn Open is a monthly open mic series for teens. It is a safe space for poets, spoken work artists, emcees, scholars and activists to share their powerful and important voices. These events are run by youth for youth, with youth DJs, youth hosts and a monthly featured poet.

    Presented in partnership with Urban Word NYC.