About Brooklyn Newsstand

Brooklyn Newsstand is a newspaper digitization initiative between Brooklyn Public Library's local history division -- the Brooklyn Collection -- and Newspapers.com.  This partnership gives the public free access to the full run of the Brooklyn Daily Eagle newspaper, which was published from 1841 to 1955. 

Thanks to a grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Sciences, Brooklyn Public Library was able to digitize a microfilmed copy the Eagle from 1841 to 1902 and make those years searchable in the Brooklyn Daily Eagle Online database.  With the second phase of digitization completed by Newspapers.com, using negative microfilm from the Library of Congress, the full breadth of the Eagle, and the history it documented, is now available for general research.  You can learn more about the history of this influential Brooklyn newspaper here.  We will continue to digitize more historic Brooklyn periodicals in the near future, so check back often to see what new resources are on offer.

Using Brooklyn Newsstand

Newspapers.com is typically a subscription-based database, but through our partnership anyone searching the database via the Brooklyn Newsstand website will have free access to our Brooklyn newspapers.  If you want to use some of the advanced features you may be prompted to register with Newspapers.com.  This registration is still free, although it will require you to provide an email address.  You do not need to hold a Brooklyn Public Library card to register with Newspapers.com.  The Brooklyn Newsstand site is currently not available on mobile devices.  As you use Brooklyn Newsstand, you should be aware of the various features offered for saving, clipping, and sharing newspaper content.

  • Print/Save -- you can click this link to either print or save any page of the newspaper you're viewing.  You will be prompted to choose to print/save the entire page or a portion. 

 

  • Share -- this allows you to share the page you're looking at with others.  You do not need to create an account with Newspapers.com to share, although you may be prompted to sign in with whatever social media login you choose.

 

  • Clip -- by clipping a portion of the page, you are saving it on the Newspapers.com site.  This is useful if you're doing in-depth research and want to organize your work.  To make clippings, you'll need to create a free account with Newspapers.com.  You will not be charged to use the site, although you may choose to subscribe to Newspapers.com if you want access to papers outside of Brooklyn. 

You should know that unless you edit your Account settings to keep your clippings to yourself, they will be visible to other users on the site. You can edit these by clicking on the drop-down arrow next to your name, once you're signed in.

 

  • Save to Ancestry -- Newspapers.com is a subsidiary of the genealogy website Ancestry.com.  If you choose to "Save to Ancestry" you will be prompted to register with that site as well.  You will be able to access some but not all of the resources on Ancestry.com, as this is a subscription site.   The library does offer free access to the Ancestry.com database in the Brooklyn Collection.